I’m A Little Bit Less Of A Fan Of Amazon

I have always been a big fan of Amazon since the advent of online shopping. I’ve always thought that they had many great features that appealed to me. Some of the best features in my mind included:

  • Excellent pricing – I’ve always felt that they are very fair in price and have good deals
  • Order history – They keep ordering history of every purchase I’ve made. Many sites keep your history for only 12 months, if even that long. I’ve always been able to look back at previous purchases for reference.
  • Recommendations – Many sites have now built in features where you are recommended products based on your ordering history. Amazon was one of the first and I think still one of the best at it.

A few months ago, my list would have included one more thing that was key: 30-day price protection. Amazon guaranteed that if their price went down anytime within 30 days of your purchase, that you were eligible for a refund. You had to e-mail them the price you paid as well as the new price, and after checking it out, they would refund your credit card. I used this several times.
That was an excellent feature, but unfortunately they discontinued that as of September 1, 2008. I just found out about it today as I was going through and checking my prices, and discovered that the new policy had been instituted.
This is a huge letdown to me.
I can understand the business reason behind it. They were probably losing money by having to return part of the sales back to people. But, I still think that’s a big short sighted. Why?
Well, not everybody checks the prices to see if the price has dropped. There are sites such as PriceProtectr.com which automates this process for you (plug: it works with over 150 online retailers and is one of my favorite sites), but even so, my guess is that a very small percentage of people actually remember or take the time to check.
The people that do take the time are probably among the people that spend the most at Amazon. I feel that this decision might have turned away many loyal customers. Yes, Amazon might save money in avoiding refunds, but what if they lose all that plus more in sales because people gravitate to other e-commerce sites?
In other words, why take the risk of alienating your best customers?
Now, I won’t boycott Amazon and they’ll probably still get a majority of my online business. But, it’s just a bit of a letdown and a bit puzzling that one of my favorite shopping sites got rid of a great feature, and one that gave them a pretty big competitive advantage.

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