OK, Arm & Hammer, What’s The Deal?

When someone says ‘Arm & Hammer’, what’s the first thing that you think of.

Chances are it’s baking soda.  I know that baking soda has many different purposes, but for me, the orange box that goes into your fridge or freezer to take away the smells is what I think of each and every time.

We buy the small boxes designed to go into the freezer and fridge.  In the ‘old days’ (think 1990’s), you would simply buy a small box, and rip the top off and set it in the fridge.  That didn’t give a lot of exposure to the baking soda to actually absorb odors, and a tipped over box equaled a big mess.  So, I’m sure people loved it when they came out with the boxes where you ripped off the cardboard off the front and back to reveal a screen that kept the baking soda in, yet allowed a lot of it to be exposed to catch odors.

Awesome, right?  And, like most everybody else, we changed them somewhat unfaithfully every 90 days.  Meaning that more often than not, it was probably four or five month between changes.  The good folks at Arm & Hammer even had a spot where you could write the ‘next due’ change date as you were putting it in, just in case you were (like me) forgetful.

So, I was amazed this past time when I went to replace my box and they now wanted you to replace your box after 30 days.

No longer was it 90 days, instead they want you to replace it every 30 days.  Now, I’m not the best at math but, if you followed the schedule, you’d be buying twenty-four boxes per year instead of eight.

Wow, where do I buy that stock if sales are going to triple?

What could be going on here?

Here are the options as I see them:

  1. They decided to cheapen up their baking soda got cheaper and it doesn’t last as long – Can you even cheapen up baking soda?
  2. We’re eating smellier foods or not cleaning out our fridges often enough – While there might be some truth to this, I think the tales of ‘moldy leftovers’ have been around for long enough that I don’t think there’s been a sudden spike
  3. Arm & Hammer is subversively trying to sell more baking soda for no benefit to the consumer

I have to think, right now, that we’re looking at option number 3.  I just can’t envision any scenario where, for decades, our collective refrigerators have been just fine with a 90-day change, but now we’re suddenly in jeopardy if we don’t switch to this new monthly cycle.

If I change my baking soda monthly, what’s going to happen?  Are our refrigerators going to last longer?  Am I going to live to 120?  Will we stop getting cancer?

Doubtful on all accounts.

So, I think I’ll just go ahead and stick with the three month schedule, Arm & Hammer.  Quite honestly, the new ‘change’ kind of stinks, if you ask me.

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6 thoughts on “OK, Arm & Hammer, What’s The Deal?

  1. They're all doing that now. They make things "concentrated" and tell you to use less of it, knowing full well that you won't and so you end up buying more. Chances are though, that you won't change the baking soda and more often than before.

  2. We use those boxes too. But what we've done is buy a huge bag of A&H at our club store, and reuse the boxes for the fridge/freezer A&H. We just empty out the used stuff into our sink/garbage disposal (cleans it up nicely), let it air out a little, then refill from our 13.5 lb bag. We also use the A&H for our baking and cleaning other things too. So bulk bag is really good and overall saves money. I believe the club sells it for less than $7.

  3. How funny, I don't think I've ever noticed the screen, or the spot to write in the "change by" date. Clearly I am not a good directions-follower, which means I'll continue my process of changing the box whenever the mood strikes me.

  4. Same as Jackie…just leave a box in and every so often get the urge to scrape a little off the top to 'freshen' things up.

  5. I think I'll go with #3 as well. Companies are constantly finding ways to sell us less of their product for more money; or sell us the same amount more often!

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