1 Step To Getting A Better Performance Review

Everybody wants a better performance review at work, right?

Everybody deserves a better performance review, right?

Well, OK, not everybody.  But you do, right?

Of course!

There’s one simple step that I would recommend you start off with.  If you’re not doing this already, you may be missing out on better reviews (which can of course translate into better raises, better job opportunities, etc.).  Ready?  Here goes:

Track your accomplishments throughout the entire year.

The way our system works is that once a year, we sit down with our managers and directors and roll through our accomplishments. They have their own ‘list’, but we also present things that we’ve done that have added value to our customer or to the company in some way.  They go back, work it all out, and then a follow-up meeting is held where we get our actual evaluation.

Having all of these accomplishments can definitely impact our ‘rating’.  We have a rating system where you get a 1-5 rating in multiple categories including job functions, financial, and training.  Getting a 4 or 5 in multiple categories is something everybody strives for.

If you and your bosses miss out on noting something that you did eleven months ago, that could be the difference between a 3 and a 4!  Not good.  But, who remembers what you did eleven months ago?  Not too many of us.

What I do is, at least once every three months, update a running ‘Accomplishments’ list.  Any big report I’ve finished or presentation I’ve given or fire I put out gets logged.  That way, it’s not a mad scramble at the end to go back and remember things that my bosses should be impressed with.

The longer you wait, the more apt you are to forget something key.  Why shoot yourself in the foot?  If you’re not tracking your accomplishments on a regular basis, I suggest you add this to the top of your To-Do list today!

3 thoughts on “1 Step To Getting A Better Performance Review”

  1. I used to maintain a file folder specifically for accomplishments. During the year, I would write down a particular one that I was proud of on my desk calendar. Then I would tear it out and through it in the folder. When I wrote up my accomplishments I had the date associated with the accomplishment. It works well and it is not a burden.

  2. MB, that's a really good recommendation you're making. We often get so busy that it's hard to spend time looking back at accomplishments unless we capture our thoughts and document right away. It's always good to be able to prove value, and have specific examples.

  3. I did this at a former job. Good record keeping turned out to be critical for proving I helped the office work on the list of expectations corporate HQ had posted.

    I kept a little notepad style doc in the computer and added to it throughout the year.

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