Put Your Worry To Productive Use

If you’re anything like me, chances are you’ve had nights with little or restless sleep because of something on your mind.  Whether you can’t fall asleep, or you can’t fall back asleep after something wakes you up, when something gets in your head, sometimes it just sticks there and it makes sleep difficult or impossible for the remainder of the night.

If this has happened to you, my question to you is what have you done about it?  If you simply drank some more coffee the next day or tried to get an earlier start to bedtime the next night, you might have missed out on an opportunity.  While those are certainly things to do in order to function in spite of the lost sleep, there’s also another potential opportunity.

Listen to what you’re worrying about.  If your mind is working that hard where it blocks sleep, then it’s trying to tell you something that you need to listen to!

And it could be telling you something that you could use to take action.

Let Worry Set Priorities

Many times, we have different things in our lives that are opportunities, and we often don’t know where to start.  Think of someone who has a bunch of debt and isn’t sure to get started.  If you’re up at night and you find yourself thinking of one more than the others, that could be a good starting point to concentrate on knocking that debt out first.  Maybe one of your debts is a personal loan, and not only is it debt that you don’t like, but it’s also to someone with whom you could be hurting a personal relationship if it’s not taken care of. Your worry might give you the motivation to move this to the top of your list.

Let Worry Identify Opportunities

If you wake up and you start thinking about your job, and how unhappy it makes you or mb-2015-05-bedhow much stress it adds to your life, maybe it’s time to take a step back and evaluate your career.  Is it time to look for a new position in your company or maybe even start looking outside your company?  Your worry could be the catalyst to improve your job situation!

Let Worry Reduce Stress

Often times, if you wake up and can’t fall back asleep, your mind races from one topic to another.  In this case, it might be difficult to latch onto one topic as an area of focus.  This can be because the individual problems may not be the areas on which you should concentrate. You mind could simply be telling you that you have way too much going on and that the answer is simply to slow down!  Maybe the answer is a few less volunteer groups or taking a break from new projects around the house for a while.

Let Worry Improve Your Relationships

Many times restlessness might bring out worry with your relationships with others.  If you’re sensing this, maybe this will help you move your focus to improving your relationships.  Restless nights can signal that the relationship that you’re worried about is important.  That means it’s worth extra focus and attention.  If you’re feeling distant from your spouse or you wonder what your kids are up to, then maybe that’s a good way to get started on improving that relationship.

Free Your Mind, And The ‘Rest’ Will Follow

Overall, the idea is simple.  Listen to what your mind is telling you.  If your mind is keeping your body up when you know it should be sleeping, that means it’s working overtime.  At most jobs, doesn’t overtime usually happen when there’s something important going on?  The same goes with your mind.  Take the time to listen to it. More importantly, take the opportunity to take your thoughts and work through the issue that’s keeping you up.  Down the road, that could just lead to some well deserved extra rest!

Readers, do you ever take your worries and treat them as opportunities?  I’d love to hear examples about how you made this work for you.

2 thoughts on “Put Your Worry To Productive Use”

  1. I’m a big time layabed worrier/thinker and the best thing it’s led to is my getting things done. I used to just get up and get some work done or figure out travel itineraries and logistics, especially for big trips overseas, and then I could rest easy. It does prod me to be more and more efficient during my days so that I don’t have any one or two things niggling at my conscience because they weren’t done.

    Most recently, the nighttime wakefulness has opened the path to a writing project that I couldn’t get a handle on, til now, and making progress on that long term project has been immensely satisfying. Also, I’m mulling over what my next career goal or venture will be, and I suspect that a few ideas will blossoming as I let the brain lay fallow.

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